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at the convergence of 50 research reports that talked about the dangers of cell phone use in testinand texting devicee driving. there was so little understanding about this. we had a massive debate. we knew this was very danger is behavior based on the research. we come from at traffic safety perspective, and we know the way to change this behavior follows the formula you heard ray lahood talk about. how you do that in the framework of very little conversation was the difficult part. a year ago on january we call for a nationwide ban on told a news and text to use while driving, and we called for companies to put in place policies prohibit the use of this. it was such a long debate press because of the lack of conversation. then i look at today and what we heard from secretary lahood and others. but that the amount of activity we have heard from a state legislative point of view, a research point of view, law enforcement point of view. i encourage you as we listen to our panelists today to think about how we maintain the momentum. i think all of us know that a year of action, even a tremendou
of manhattan and brooklyn and you can see pictures of this in front of us. into this toxic crowd ran firefighters and police and other first responders. first responders came from all 50 states to aid in the rescue and cleanup of the subsequent days. the environmental protection administration, e.p.a., despite ample evidence to the contrary kept falsely proclaiming that the air was safe to breathe. it wasn't. the terrorists caused environmental catastrophe but the federal government compounded the damage by telling people the environment was safe when it wasn't and now thousands of people are sick and in need of special care. we have a moral obligation to treat those who became ill and that's what this bill is all about. for eight years representative maloney and i supported a bipartisan basis by the new york delegation and others have worked to bring this bill to the floor. now it is finally time to pass it. time and again, as we move this bill through the legislative process, we've adjusted it, reduced its size and scope, limited its cost and made concessions to broaden the coaliti
for being with us from the north slope. can you talk a little bit about the interaction you have had with shell and their plans to develop up there and whether the is use your raise in your testimony you have been able to address satisfactorily or if there are other issues you would like resolved before they proceed? >> thank you, commissioner. the overriding concern continues to be the possibility of an oil spill. [inaudible] our problem is the oil spill equipment and the technology has never been tested here in the arctic in real-life situations due to the rules of the united states. because there has never been any real exercise here in the arctic involving broken ice conditions and the recovery of oil. it is the burning that is being mentioned, the technology being used in warmer waters, it has never been done up here and that continues to be our concern. it is difficult to take the words of industry and agencies just that their words. that is the overriding condition. the least-sale provisions i mentioned earlier continue to be the focus for the lower 48 waters. the time frame f
with north korea, the primary responsibility is north korea's. it brought us to this point, and if we are going to move to a better place, it will be up to north korea to demonstrate it is prepared to engage constructively. >> >> that is really up to north korea to take responsibility for any of its actions. we are all trying to interpret what has happened and work collaborative lead to interment -- collaborative leak to determine the best path for. >> to you believe it depends on china? whenever something happens in the region, there the first for consultation. >> we call the six party process because we of the country's that armas significantly affected by and have the ability to shape peace and security in the region. china has a special responsibility. it has been a leader within the six-party process and we will look to china to demonstrate leadership going forward. china has had recent high-level meetings with the north koreans. we will vow to their sharing their perspective with us -- we will value their sharing their specs -- their perspective with us. they have a special role
someone to it to the citizens' private fund, using organizations like the popular organizations where clients go in and file lawsuits, because they take money and use it for their campaign and basically leave the person that is lucky plan to -- that is the plaintiff in this particular situation penniless, and nobody does anything about it. and those that are members of the local church -- they go from church to church, to help fund the organization. i find that robbing people, legally doing it, and ignoring it when making a complaint -- we have to find where the money comes from and i think we are doing a poor job on that. thank you, and have a great day. guest: i am not sure i totally understand the question, but in terms of disclosure, that is a very important part of the process now, because there is more ability to spend money. i think that a lot of voters would be interested in knowing as much as they can about where the support for a particular candidate is coming from. host: people are looking at the race in minnesota as a real test case of the citizens united decision. guest:
have to give us adequate time to get to the floor so we can respond to the bills and i am recognized and am making a statement because i'm really upset. this is the way the majority has been running the congress, mr. speaker. . you wonder why the american people are upset with majority is because of this. if you don't give adequate notice to the ranking member to be to the floor on bills, people are going to know. you know they are going to know? because i'm going to tell the story. rules matter around this place. now, let me go back to the first bill. the only reason i want to mention this is because i want to thank, you just passed it, we are going to do it by voice, let me tell you what's upsetting. it's the parliamentarian. from the time you drop that bill and the parliamentarian makes sure it gets to the jurisdictions. some might get amended and some other committee thinks they want a view on it. what happens is the majority not giving a doggone about the minority puts bills on this floor no matter what they do so long it's in comfort with someone else. they don't care about the
permits. i'd now like to introduce our head table guests from your right. jeff, u.s. senate press gallery. jean from yahoo! news. lisa, "tribune newspaper's" "l.a. times." al, "the hill." andrew snyder, chairman of the speaker's committee, associate editor, kip linger washington editors. deborah, senior vice president, haguer sharp, and speaker's committee member who organized today's event. shawn, member of the press club board of governors. jonathan, bloomberg and former n.p.c. president. and a member from bergen records. [applause] today we are a little over a month away from elections that will likely bring changes in washington. poll after poll shows that voters are not happy. there's plenty of evidence that shows incurveents are unhappy. the economy is still struggling. the senate seems unable to move forward with major legislation as gridlock sets in final days before elections. it's not pretty. it's probably not a great time to be in charge of winning elections all over the country. or is it? our speakers today are two of the men who are in charge of leading their party's efforts
think someone can come up with the exact figure, and all of the resources being used for a human destruction, why can they not be used to improve the quality of life, living conditions, and the structure, and given a future to the people of india? [unintelligible] this mahomet gandhi was alive today, what kind of device which he did to the indian leadership? >> we will take that as a comment, not a question. [laughter] the gentleman in the back. >> we are prisoners of the past. when you talk about military, there are at least two wars in the past. we have to project that in a linear fashion. i would like you to comment on the macro side in the sense that the borders were imposed by the british on the locals. the chinese border was [unintelligible] then, [unintelligible] acted on his temper, winston churchill -- and his emperor, winston churchill. why is this border so solid? secondly, on pakistan, you have an enormous tragedy. what are the opportunities for the bigger the deal maker? >> let me comment on that, not the last part, because we are still discovering what is happening
at the time of economic and fiscal arrested, and second is this the best use of limited dollars given the pressing needs to take cover ou care of our people. i share the secretary's objectives are reducing duplication overhead and access in the defense enterprise and instilling a culture of savings and restraint across the department of defense. on august 9, the sector followed up by announcing a series of specific cost-cutting measures, including a reduction in funding and for service support contracts by 10% per year for three years, a freeze on the number of o.s.d. defense agencies, a freeze on the general officers, a review and reduction of the number of reports, studies, and advisory boards, new limits on positions and contractors for intelligence functions. i agree with the secretary on the rapidly-expanding service contractors who supports the department. too often in the past we have constrained and number of department of defense employees without raisplacing a limit on service contractors. and rather than saving money, we have lost badly needed talent, expertise, and institu
pensions were rewards of for a long work, and we used to regulate labor markets for companies. the retirement age, the existence of retirement age in our society is a function of decisions, both of increased productivity in the last century and decisions we made about allocating leisure. much of the leisure we chose to take from increased productivity went into shorter workweeks, went into longer vacations, earlier than in the last century, before say the 1950's. after the 1940's or so, much of the increased leisure went into what we call retirement, a time of non-work. we created this institution. it is malleable to some extent. it is also terribly important. the yearly retirement story is interesting. it begins to some extent with the unions very successfully negotiating 30-year and out early retirement options, and many of the unions that have defined benefits in many of the businesses agreed to early retirement provisions that served the purpose of on the one hand, rewarding workers for long-term service, and two, turning over the labor force. i say that because the flip s
you so much for being with us on this wednesday. we will take you to the house of representatives live next. we will be back tomorrow morning at 7:00 a.m. eastern time. today the house is working hard to get out of here, we do not know the schedule will change, but we for sure know that one of the bills on their agenda today is a discussion about compensation for 9/11 first responders who have developed health problems. thank you for being with us. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] periods [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.] the speaker: the house will be in order. the prayer will be offered by the guest chaplain, reverend scott moore, doctorial student, germany. the chaplain: god of the nations, you have chosen many in various ways to show your pre
to certain entities that will use the funds to make loans to consumers to implement energy efficient measures involving structural improvements and investments in cost effective commercial off-the-shelf technologies to improve home energy use. the speaker pro tempore: referred to the house calendar and ordered printed. mr. arcuri: thank you, mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: the chair will entertain requests for one-minute speeches. for what purpose does the gentleman from nebraska rise? >> request permission to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. fortenberry: mr. speaker, he was called a young man of integrity and respect, a great marine who loved the marine corps, a loving husband and father. this is how the late staff sergeant michael a. bach was remembered by those who knew him. he was conducting operations in the hellman province in afghanistan when his patrol came under fire and died from those injuries on august 13. he had served four deployments in beeth iraq and afghanistan and was awarded the purple heart, navy and marine corps achie
of medical technology changes over that period of time. you have diseases like pneumonia that used to kill people and now you take a few pills. we have had all these changes and that has not changed the fact that health care -- when we are wealthier, we want to consume more health care. we want to stay healthier. we're willing to pay for it and replace body parts. when you get old, you are replacing these body parts. we have not been able to control that because no one is paying for it. if individuals were paying for it, it might look different. with 60 years of consistent growth, i think we are projecting that time and saying magic will not happen in the next 60 years. we would say the variances small parade you are absolutely right that we do not know what will happen in the future. i think it is largely about incentives. if we are structuring the incentives, we are not making the providers -- we need to take medicare advantage and give people premium support and make medicare all medicare advantage and go out and let them bid to get the customers instead of us telling them what we will
. mr. neal: madam speaker, more than 100 years ago the first u.s. mutual fund was started in boston. mutual funds have been a way of life for every man to invest in the market. with the benefits of pooling and diversification. it invites the term mutualization. today more than 50 million households invest through mutual funds with a median household income of $80,000. more than 50% of 401-k assets were invested in mutual funds at the end of 2009. h.r. 4337 was introduced last year by mr. rangel and i to modernize the tax laws regarding to regulate investment companies, better known as mutual funds. a technical explanation and revenue table for this bill may be found on the joint tax website, www.jtc.gov. the tax rules that relate to mutual funds date back to more than half a century. although those rules have been updated from time to time, it's been over 20 years since they were last revisited. the bill before us today would make several changes to the tax code to address outdated provisions such as rules that relates to preferential dividends and rules to mutual funds to send noti
, this has helped us a lot combat the production. we formed in east tennessee, what was the southeast tennessee meth task force which was a local, state and federal partnership because methamphetamine production can't be combat the exclusively at the state and local level. they just simply can't. they didn't have the resources to surveil it. it becomes a toxic site where it is made, so they didn't have the resources to clean it up. and it grew to be the east tennessee meth task force and now it is a statewide task force. we have had tremendous success. but we have to continue to modernize the laws, including federal component in order for drug professionals to be able to keep it out of the hands of people who are addicted, because they produce this, most of the time, for use. and as a result, this is just a deadly, deadly disease out in the hinterland of america and we have to fight it. this bill is another step in the right direction. congressman gordon and i worked together and congressman cooper passed a bill a few years ago to create federal grant support of the children who are t
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15